This year's keynotes & distinguished speakers

Keynote speakers and guest speakers

Get to know speakers who will shed light on long-term thinking beyond short-term constraints

  • All
  • Keynote and guest speakers
  • Sir Simon Fraser
    Sir Simon Fraser
    Former Permanent Secretary at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office
  • Stephen Gilmore
    Stephen Gilmore
    University Professor, Columbia University.
  • Enrico Letta
    Enrico Letta
    Former Prime Minister, Italy
  • Kishore Mahbubani
    Kishore Mahbubani
    University Professor, Columbia University.
  • Kenneth Rogoff
    Kenneth Rogoff
    Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy and Professor of Economics at Harvard University & former Chief Economist at the International Monetary Fund
  • Professor Nouriel Roubini
    Professor Nouriel Roubini
    Professor of Economics at New York University's Stern School of Business
  • Joseph E. Stiglitz
    Joseph E. Stiglitz
    University Professor, Columbia University.
  • Janet L. Yellen
    Janet L. Yellen
    Chair, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System (2014–2018)
Sir Simon Fraser
Former Permanent Secretary at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Simon Fraser is Managing Partner of Flint Global Ltd, a company that supports businesses in successfully handling major transactions, and in managing the impact of legislative and regulatory change in London, Europe and international markets.

Simon previously served as Permanent Secretary at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and head of the UK Diplomatic Service from August 2010 to July 2015. In this period he was on the UK’s National Security Council.

Prior to that Simon was Permanent Secretary at the UK Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. He has also served as Director General for Europe and Globalization in the FCO and as chief of staff to European Trade Commissioner Peter Mandelson. These roles have given him deep experience of working at the interface between government and business in the UK and the EU.

Simon’s particular foreign policy expertise is in Europe, trade and economic diplomacy, France and the Middle East. As well as spending six years in the European Commission, he has worked in the British Embassies in Baghdad and Damascus and as political counsellor at the British Embassy in Paris and Head of Policy Planning in the FCO.

As Permanent Secretary at the FCO during a period of great international upheaval and domestic austerity, Simon Fraser led an expansion of the UK’s diplomatic network while taking almost 25 per cent out of FCO running costs. He has a strong interest in leadership of people and organizations, and was the UK Civil Service champion for diversity and inclusion.

Stephen Gilmore
University Professor, Columbia University.

Stephen Gilmore was previously the Chief Investment Strategist at Future Fund. He led the Investment Strategy Group, which was responsible for portfolio strategy, including macroeconomic and market monitoring and asset allocation, investment risk and the implementation of various portfolio level derivative overlays. He also had oversight of a range of investment data and analytics initiatives. Stephen was a member of the Fund’s Investment and Management Committees.

Stephen joined the team at Future Fund after having previously worked in senior strategy roles in London and Hong Kong with AIG Financial Products and Morgan Stanley. Prior to that, Stephen worked with both the International Monetary Fund in Washington and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

Enrico Letta
Former Prime Minister, Italy

Enrico Letta is the Dean of the Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA) at Sciences Po in Paris. He was the Prime Minister of Italy from April 2013 to February 2014.

Before he served as Minister for EU Affairs (1998-1999), as Minister for Industry, Commerce and Crafts (January-April 2000, during the second D’Alema Government), as Minister for Industry, Commerce and Crafts and Foreign Trade (2000-2001, during the second Amato Government) and as Undersecretary of State to the Prime Minister of the centre- left government led by Romano Prodi from 2006 to 2008.

Between 2001 and 2015 he was Member of the Italian Parliament, excluding between 2004 and 2006 when he was Member of the European Parliament. He also served as deputy Secretary of the Democratic Party (PD) from 2009 to 2013.

From 1993 to May 2013 he managed an independent think tank, Arel, founded by the late Beniamino Andreatta. He was also Vice Chairman of Aspen Institute Italia, President of the Italy-Spain Dialogue Forum, and a member of the Trilateral Commission.

He was born in Pisa (Tuscany) in 1966 and he spent the rst years of his life in Strasbourg. He graduated in International Law at the University of Pisa and obtained a PhD in European Union Law at the School for Advanced Studies “Sant’Anna” of Pisa.

His whole career and thought have been shaped by a strong commitment to Europe.

He is the author of many books on international and economic affairs, with particular reference to EU enlargement, including:

  • Euro sì – Morire per Maastricht (Laterza, 1997);
  • Dialogo intorno all’Europa (with L. Caracciolo, Laterza, 2002); L’allargamento dell’Unione Europea (Il Mulino, 2003);
  • L’Europa a Venticinque (Il Mulino, 2005);
  • In questo momento sta nascendo un bambino (Rizzoli, 2007);
  • Costruire una Cattedrale (Mondadori, 2009);
  • L’Europa è nita? (with L. Caracciolo, ADD Editore 2010);
  • Andare insieme, andare lontano (Mondadori, 2015).
Kishore Mahbubani
University Professor, Columbia University.

Professor Kishore Mahbubani is Senior Advisor (University & Global Relations) and Professor in the Practice of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore, where he also served as Dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy from 2004 to 2017. Concurrently, Prof Mahbubani serves in the Boards and Councils of institutions around the world, including the Yale President’s Council on International Activities (PCIA), University of Bocconi International Advisory Committee, World Economic Forum – Global Agenda Council on Geo-economics and as Chairman of the Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize Nominating Committee. Before that, he enjoyed a long career with the Singapore Foreign Service from 1971 to 2004. He had postings in Cambodia (where he served during the war in 1973-74), Malaysia, Washington DC and New York, where he served two stints as Singapore’s Ambassador to the UN and as President of the UN Security Council in January 2001 and May 2002. He continues to serve the UN as a member of the team of external advisors to the President of the 72nd session of the United Nations General Assembly H.E. Mr. Miroslav Lajčák. He was Permanent Secretary at the Singapore Foreign Ministry from 1993 to 1998.

Prof Mahbubani has spoken and published globally. He is the author of Can Asians Think?, Beyond The Age Of Innocence, The New Asian Hemisphere, The Great Convergence (which was selected by the Financial Times as one of the best books of 2013) and Can Singapore Survive?, and co-author of The ASEAN Miracle. His latest book, Has the West Lost it? A Provocation will be released in April 2018.  More information on his writings can be found at www.mahbubani.net.

Prof Mahbubani was awarded the President’s Scholarship in 1967. He graduated with a First Class honours degree in Philosophy from the University of Singapore in 1971. From Dalhousie University, Canada, he received a Masters degree in Philosophy in 1976 and an honorary doctorate in 1995. He spent a year as a fellow at the Center for International Affairs at Harvard University from 1991 to 1992. Prof Mahbubani was conferred The Public Administration Medal (Gold) by the Singapore Government in 1998. He was listed as one of the top 100 public intellectuals in the world by Foreign Policy and Prospect magazines in September 2005, and included in the March 2009 Financial Times list of Top 50 individuals who would shape the debate on the future of capitalism. He was selected as one of Foreign Policy’s Top Global Thinkers in 2010 and 2011. In 2011, he was described as “the muse of the Asian century”. Most recently, he was selected by Prospect magazine as one of the top 50 world thinkers for 2014.

Kenneth Rogoff
Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy and Professor of Economics at Harvard University & former Chief Economist at the International Monetary Fund

Kenneth Rogoff is Thomas D. Cabot Professor at Harvard University, and former Chief Economist at the International Monetary Fund.   His 2009 book with Carmen Reinhart, This Time is Different:  Eight Centuries of Financial Folly has been widely cited by academics, policymakers and journalists, while its massive data set has been extensively used by researchersworldwide. His influential recent book The Curse of Cashexplores the past, present and future of currency from standardized coins to cryptocurrencies. Rogoff’s monthly syndicated column on global economic issues appears in over 50 countries. He is the among the top ten on RePec’s ranking of economists by citations.

Rogoff is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Group of Thirty. He is also an international grandmaster of chess.

 

Professor Nouriel Roubini
Professor of Economics at New York University's Stern School of Business

Professor Nouriel Roubini, renowned Economist who predicted the 2007 Global Financial Crisis and Credit Crunch

Nouriel Roubini is Professor of Economics at New York University’s Stern School of Business. He is Chairman of Roubini Macro Associates, a global macroeconomic consultancy firm in New York.

Roubini has extensive policy experience as well as broad academic credentials. He was Co-Founder and Chairman of Roubini Global Economics from 2005-16 – a firm whose website was named one of the best economics web resources by BusinessWeek, Forbes, the Wall Street Journal and the Economist.

From 1998-2000, he served as the Senior Economist for International Affairs on the White House Council of Economic Advisors and then Senior Advisor to the Undersecretary for International Affairs at the U.S. Treasury Department, helping to resolve the Asian and global financial crises, among other issues. The International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and numerous other prominent public and private institutions all draw upon his advisory expertise.

Roubini has published numerous theoretical, empirical and policy papers on international macroeconomic issues and coauthored the books Political Cycles: Theory and Evidence and Bailouts or Bail-ins? Responding to Financial Crises in Emerging Markets and Crisis Economics: A Crash Course in the Future of Finance.

Subjects:

  • Risks in the Global Economy and Financial Markets
  • Globalisation, Trade, Technology: Impact on Jobs and Their Discontents
  • Key Economic Challenges Future Policy
  • Fin-Tech, Blockchain and Crypto Currencies

Books:

  • Crisis Economics: A Crash Course in the Future of Finance
  • Bailouts or Bail-ins? Responding to Financial Crises in Emerging Markets
  • Political Cycles: Theory and Evidence
Joseph E. Stiglitz
University Professor, Columbia University.

Joseph E. Stiglitz was born in Gary, Indiana in 1943. A graduate of Amherst College, he received his PhD from MIT in 1967, became a full professor at Yale in 1970, and in 1979 was awarded the John Bates Clark Award, given biennially by the American Economic Association to the economist under 40 who has made the most significant contribution to the field. He has taught at Princeton, Stanford, MIT and was the Drummond Professor and a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is now University Professor at Columbia University in New York, where he is also the founder and Co-President of the university’s Initiative for Policy Dialogue. He is also the Chief Economist of the Roosevelt Institute. In 2001, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics for his analyses of markets with asymmetric information, and he was a lead author of the 1995 Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. In 2011, Time named Stiglitz one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

Stiglitz was a member of the Council of Economic Advisers from 1993-95, during the Clinton administration, and served as CEA chairman from 1995-97. He then became Chief Economist and Senior Vice-President of the World Bank from 1997-2000. In 2008 he was asked by the French President Nicolas Sarkozy to chair the Commission on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress, which released its final report in September 2009 (published as Mismeasuring Our Lives). He now chairs a High Level Expert Group at the OECD attempting to advance further these ideas. In 2009 he was appointed by the President of the United Nations General Assembly as chair of the Commission of Experts on Reform of the International Financial and Monetary System, which also released its report in September 2009 (published as The Stiglitz Report). Since the crisis, he has played an important role in the creation of the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET), which seeks to reform the discipline so it is better equipped to find solutions for the great challenges of the 21st century.

Stiglitz serves on numerous boards, including the Acumen Fund and Resources for the Future.

Stiglitz helped create a new branch of economics, « The Economics of Information, » exploring the consequences of information asymmetries and pioneering such pivotal concepts as adverse selection and moral hazard, which have now become standard tools not only of theorists, but also of policy analysts. He has made major contributions to macroeconomics and monetary theory, to development economics and trade theory, to public and corporate finance, to the theories of industrial organization and rural organization, and to the theories of welfare economics and of income and wealth distribution. In the 1980s, he helped revive interest in the economics of R&D.

His work has helped explain the circumstances in which markets do not work well, and how selective government intervention can improve their performance.

In the last fifteen years, he has written a series of highly popular books that have had an enormous influence in shaping global debates. His book Globalization and Its Discontents (2002) has been translated into 35 languages, besides at least two pirated editions, and in the non-pirated editions have sold more than one million copies worldwide. In that book he laid bare the way globalization had been managed, especially by the international financial institutions. In two later sequels, he presented alternatives: Fair Trade for All (2005, with Andrew Charlton) and Making Globalization Work (2006). In The Roaring Nineties (2003), he explained how financial market deregulation and other actions of the 1990s were sowing the seeds of the next crisis. Concurrently, Towards a New Paradigm in Monetary Economics (2003, with Bruce Greenwald) explained the fallacies of current monetary policies, identified the risk of excessive financial interdependence, and highlighted the central role of credit availability. Freefall: America, Free Markets, and the Sinking of the World Economy (2010) traced in more detail the origins of the Great Recession, outlined a set of policies that would lead to robust recovery, and correctly predicted that if these policies were not pursued, it was likely that we would enter an extended period of malaise. The Three Trillion Dollar War: The True Cost of the Iraq Conflict (2008, with Linda Bilmes of Harvard University), helped reshape the debate on those wars by highlighting the enormous costs of those conflicts. His most recent books are The Price of Inequality: How Today’s Divided Society Endangers Our Future, published by W.W. Norton and Penguin/ Allen Lane in 2012; Creating a Learning Society: A New Approach to Growth, Development, and Social Progress, with Bruce Greenwald, published by Columbia University Press in 2014; The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them published by W.W. Norton and Penguin/ Allen Lane in 2015; Rewriting the Rules of the American Economy: An Agenda for Growth and Shared Prosperity published by W.W. Norton in 2015, The Euro: How a Common Currency Threatens the Future of Europe published by W.W. Norton and Penguin/Allen Lane in 2016 and Globalization and Its Discontents Revisited: Anti-Globalization in the Era of Trump published by W.W. Norton and Penguin/Allen Lane in 2017.

Stiglitz’s work has been widely recognized. Among his awards are more than 40 honorary doctorates, including from Cambridge and Oxford Universities. In 2010 he was awarded the prestigious Loeb Prize for this contributions to journalism. Among the prizes awarded to his books have been the European Literary Prize, the Bruno Kreisky Prize for Political Books and the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the Econometric Society, and a corresponding fellow of the Royal Society and the British Academy.

He has been decorated by several governments, including Colombia, Ecuador, and Korea, and most recently became a member of France’s Legion of Honor (rank of Officier).

Janet L. Yellen
Chair, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System (2014–2018)

Janet L. Yellen is a Distinguished Fellow in Residence at the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy at the Brookings Institution. She served as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 2014 through February 2018. Before that, she served as Vice Chair of the Board of Governors and, from 2004 to 2010, as president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

Dr. Yellen previously served as a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from August 1994 through February 1997, whereupon she was appointed by President Bill Clinton to serve as chair of the Council of Economic Advisers, a post she held until August 1999.

Dr. Yellen has written on a wide variety of macroeconomic issues, specializing in the causes, mechanisms, and implications of unemployment. She began her career as an assistant professor at Harvard University and then served as an economist with the Federal Reserve’s Board of Governors before joining the faculty of the London School of Economics in 1978. In 1980 she joined the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley, where she was named the Eugene E. and Catherine M. Trefethen Professor of Business and Professor of Economics, and where she is currently a professor emeritus.

Dr. Yellen graduated from Brown University in 1967 and received her PhD in economics from Yale University in 1971. She received the Wilbur Cross Medal from Yale in 1997, honorary degrees from Brown, Bard College, the London School of Economics and Political Science, the University of Warwick and Yale. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has served as president of the Western Economic Association, vice president of the American Economic Association, and a fellow of the Yale Corporation. She is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association.

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